Do I Cure Severs Disease At Home ?

Overview

Sever's disease occurs in children when the growth plate (which is the growing part of the heel) is injured. The foot is one of the first body parts to grow to full size. This usually occurs in early puberty. During this time, bones often grow faster than muscles and tendons. As a result, muscles and tendons become tight. The heel area is less flexible. During weight-bearing activity (activity performed while standing), the tight heel tendons may put too much pressure at the back of the heel (where the Achilles tendon attaches). This can injure the heel and cause Sever's disease.

Causes

Sever?s disease is often associated with a growth spurt, when the bones grow but the muscles do not. Therefore the muscles effectively become tighter which results in increased stress at the heel. It may also be related to unusual biomechanics, for instance poor foot posture, muscle tightness or muscle weakness. Overtraining or incorrect training can also play a part. Usually, the cause is a combination of factors.

Symptoms

On examination, the typical signs are tenderness on palpation of the heel, particularly on deep palpation at the Achilles tendon insertion. Pain on dorsiflexion of the ankle, particularly when doing active toe raises; forced dorsiflexion of the ankle is also uncomfortable. Swelling of the heel, usually mild. Calcaneal enlargement, in long-standing cases.

Diagnosis

It is not difficult for a doctor to diagnose Sever's disease in a youngster or teenager. A personal history and a physical examination are usually all it takes to determine the cause of heel pain.

Non Surgical Treatment

Sever?s disease will go away on its own with rest or after heel bone growth is complete, usually within 2 to 8 weeks after the heel pain or discomfort appears. Sever?s disease is not expected to cause long-term problems, though symptoms may linger for up to several years in severe cases. Certain conservative care measures may be helpful in treating this health problem, including avoiding activities that provoke pain or discomfort, elevating the leg while at rest, performing hamstring and calf muscle stretches two to three times per day, undergoing physical therapy, using cold therapy, using an elastic wrap or compression stocking, Avoiding footwear with heel elevation, toe spring, and toe taper, and instead favoring footwear that?s completely flat and widest at the ends of the toes. More aggressive treatment measures, including over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medication (e.g. ibuprofen), steroid injections, and surgery, may be indicated in certain cases. Addressing the footwear component of this health problem is an important part of a well-rounded Sever?s disease treatment plan. Optimal footwear for preventing or treating this problem is flat, wide (widest at the ends of the toes), and flexible in the sole. Open-back footwear (such as certain Crocs models) may be particularly helpful for kids and teens with Sever?s disease.

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